donmopsick

Current appearances and short essays by jazz bassist Don Mopsick

Posts Tagged ‘swinging

Dan Miller Quartet Returns to The Roadhouse Cafe Florida on Tuesday Nights

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Dan Miller, Don Mopsick and Joe Delaney at the Roadhouse Cafe in 2016

Dan Miller, bassist Don Mopsick and pianist Joe Delaney at the Roadhouse Cafe in 2016

Third Season at Popular Ft. Myers Night Spot Kicks Off October 11

The Roadhouse Cafe in Ft. Myers FL presents the Dan Miller Quartet Tuesday nights at 7:00 beginning October 11, 2016. The Roadhouse, owned and operated by Marc and Sherri Neeley, features fine dining and entertainment 6 nights a week. The very popular Cafe features a well-stocked bar and wine list, dance floor and piano bar. The Roadhouse was named in the December 2015 issue of Gulf Coast Life magazine as having the “Best Live Music in Southwest Florida.”

The Dan Miller Quartet plays in a modern jazz style known as bebop or “hard bop,” featuring Great American Songbook and Jazz standard tunes in the styles of Miles Davis, Art Blakey, Thelonius Monk, Dizzy Gillespie, Benny Golson, Horace Silver, etc. The members of the Quartet are all seasoned jazz professionals and have held down prestigious jobs around the US and abroad in previous years.

Dan Miller

Dan Miller

Jazz trumpeter Dan Miller is one of Southwest Florida’s most accomplished musicians. A native of Chicago, Miller began his illustrious career in the early 1990s, playing in bands led by Woody Herman, Maynard Ferguson, Wynton Marsalis and Harry Connick Jr., the latter association comprising of over a decade of touring and recording.

In 2004, Dan began to split his time between New York and Florida. He started performing at Ellington’s Jazz Bar and Restaurant on Sanibel Island, FL where he led his own groups as well others as a sideman featuring Jimmy McGriff, David “Fathead” Newman, Jimmy Norman, Lew DelGatto, Jon Weber, Davell Crawford and Danny Sinoff. From 2005-2009, Dan was a member of the Danny Sinoff Quartet, recording three CDs for E.S.P. (the third featured tenor saxophonist David “Fathead” Newman).

Since 2010, Dan has been a member of the Naples Philharmonic Jazz Orchestra.

Dan continues to perform regularly in New York, appearing frequently at Smalls and Fat Cat as a leader or in bands led by Ned Goold or saxophonist Tim McCall. He often finds himself playing in NYC with musicians like his brother trombonist David Miller, bassist Ben Wolfe, Neal Caine, Anthony Pinciotti, Spike Wilner,  Stephen Riley and Carlos DeRosa.

Through a life of playing, studying and listening, Miller’s knowledge of jazz is wide-ranging and comprehensive. He lists many musical influences including Fats Navarro, Dizzy Gillespie, Freddie Hubbard, Kenny Dorham, Lee Morgan, Charlie Parker, Sonny Rollins, Thelonious Monk and Curtis Fuller. In Florida and nationwide, Miller is very much in-demand as a jazz educator–in private instruction in brass technique, jazz improvisation as well as coaching school jazz bands at all levels.

joe-delaney

Joe Delaney

Pianist Joe Delaney was born in Brockton, MA and grew up in Whitman, just south of Boston. Joe’s father Ed Delaney was also a pianist. Joe started playing at age 3, learning by ear from records, family parties and his father’s band rehearsals. Joe says, “I picked it up and still play about 90% by ear.”

Joe started formal instruction and began performing in pubic at the age of 5. Joe says, “Once we started little kid tunes, I’d hear the teacher play it and put about 15 minutes into my lesson and just mimic it back.” He was soon spending hours a day learning popular tunes and George Shearing hits he heard during the band rehearsals. Later, Joe studied briefly with Kurt Wenzel, Charlie Banocos, Kenny Barron and Berklee piano professor Paul Schmeling. During his formative years Joe absorbed the musical influences of George Shearing, Erroll Garner, Ahmad Jamal, Ramsey Lewis, Sergio Mendes, Antonio Carlos Jobim, Bill Evans, Dave McKenna, Oscar Peterson and Herbie Hancock.

Delaney worked in the Boston and Cape Cod areas until 1981, when he moved to the US Virgin Islands, where he worked for most of the ’80s. From 1989-2009 Joe returned to New England, based in Cape Cod, mostly in Hyannis. He had a long association with reedman Dick Johnson, who led the Artie Shaw Orchestra during this period. Joe traveled with the Shaw Orchestra for six years, sometimes playing alongside trumpet great Lou Colombo. While not touring with the Shaw band or his own groups (on 5 continents), Delaney played extended residencies in virtually every live music venue on Cape Cod. He spent 7 years leading the house trio at the Black Cat Tavern at Hyannis Harbor, now owned and operated by David Colombo.

Joe has recorded many jazz albums and CDs both as leader and sideman, as well as commercial jingles (for Pepsi, Beck’s Beer, among others), and movie soundtracks (Mrs. Worthington’s Party).

Don Mopsick © Ken Franckling

Don Mopsick © Ken Franckling

Bassist Don Mopsick hails from Linden, New Jersey. He attended the Manhattan School of Music, and upon graduation in 1977 relocated to Ft. Myers FL. After a move to Orlando in 1983 he found himself in demand statewide, playing jazz concerts in Orlando, Tallahassee, Gainesville, Jacksonville, Sarasota, Miami, Ft. Lauderdale, Daytona and elsewhere. In 1991 he joined the Jim Cullum Jazz Band in San Antonio, TX and appeared weekly on the Riverwalk Jazz series on the Public Radio International network. While with Cullum, Mopsick recorded radio shows with Dick Hyman, John and Bucky Pizzarelli, Clark Terry, Kenny Davern, Linda Hopkins, Benny Carter, Bob Wilber, Milt Hinton, Ralph Sutton, Harry Allen, Ken Peplowski, Joe Williams, “Sweets” Edison, Shelly Berg, Stephanie Nakasian, Rebecca Kilgore and many other greats of jazz.

Since his 2010 return to the Sunshine State, Mopsick played local Southwest Florida concert dates with Dick Hyman, Peter Appleyard, Aaron Weinstein, Tedd Firth, Bucky Pizzarelli, Johnny Varro, Cynthia Sayer, Dave Bennett, Tad Weed, Ira Sullivan, Billy Marcus, Giacomo Gates, Russell Malone, Lainie Cook, Ralph Peterson, Jr., Peter Zak, Stephanie Nakasian and her husband pianist Hod O’Brien and daughter Veronica Swift, and others. He has appeared independently in nationwide concerts and festivals with Hyman, Ralph Sutton, John Bunch, Ira Sullivan, Red Rodney, Buddy DeFranco, Randy Sandke, Warren Vaché, Scott Hamilton, Bill Allred and many others.

Other than the Roadhouse, Mopsick appears on Thursday nights at Valenti’s Allegro Bistro in Venice with vocalist Deborah Opie, pianist Billy Marcus and drummer Stephen Bucholtz.

Tony Vigilante

Tony Vigilante

Jazz drummer Tony Vigilante is a native of Philadelphia. Since his move to Naples, FL he has become in demand throughout the Southwest Florida region for his wonderfully buoyant, driving swing feel and impeccable time.

During a long career, Tony has backed up many singers and entertainers such as Della Reese, Billy Eckstine, Maureen McGovern and Perry Como. He’s recorded with Buddy De Franco, the Al Raymond Orchestra and the Brian Pastor Big Band. Vigilante was a member of Ben Vereen’s touring band performing in Las Vegas, Reno and Tahoe casinos, as well as numerous theater performances on the East Coast. In television, Tony worked in live studio bands for shows such as Good Morning America, The Mike Douglas Show, The Phil Donahue Show and an HBO special, Ben Vereen Live from The Riviera Hotel in Las Vegas.

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Written by Don Mopsick

September 2, 2015 at 3:00 AM

Swingin’ Unplugged

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Electric instruments—especially the electric guitar—have become so universal and ubiquitous in the post-WWII rock-dominated world of pop music that a word had to be invented to denote the old-school way: “unplugged.”

Decades ago, an ad agency for 7-Up came up with the ingenious and successful “un-cola” campaign, and proved that defining things by what they are not can appeal to the impulse to stand out from the crowd, go your own way, and march to the beat of a different drummer.

As a mid-Boomer, I saw my first electric instruments at age 12 when my big brother Mike came home with a Fender Stratocaster guitar and a Precision bass guitar. Both of these instruments are solid-bodied, meaning that they have no acoustic sound of their own—they must be plugged into an amplifier to be heard. Mike let me fool around with the P-bass. In the quiet of our living room, without using the amp I could hear the tiny, plinky sounds the P-bass made well enough to learn how to get around on it.

I also played the trumpet in the junior high school Band, two hours per week during the school day, but after school I played bass guitar in a rock and roll “garage band” with its heady promise of raw sexual power. In theory at least, plugging in an electric guitar converted one’s testosterone into electrons, which were then broadcast directly into the brains of nearby females via an irresistible magnetic beam.

It turned out that we were the first generation of musicians steeped in the dual worlds of loud, electrified rock ‘n roll and softer, subtler unplugged jazz, folk, and classical music.

Jazz had discovered the electric guitar in the late 1930s with Charlie Christian, and Miles Davis embraced rock rhythms and all-electric combinations with his seminal 1971 albums Bitches Brew and In a Silent Way. Since then, electrified rock elements have been important contributors to whatever commercial success jazz has had in recent years. These days, the average listener is likely to encounter a live “jazz” performance not quite up to the volume of a heavy metal band, but very loud nonetheless.

As a young adult professional musician, I went through what I thought of then as reinventing myself as a  “jazz bassist.” In my work I used both the solid-body electric bass guitar and the bass fiddle. According to the fashion of the time, I explored every known method of amplifying the fiddle. My aim was to produce a sound at least loud enough to compete with the other players who would show up to the job with their amps and gear. I didn’t know it at the time, but I was contributing to an endless “arms race” of upwardly spiraling volume levels.

The results were rarely satisfying. In all of my experimenting, I never found a pickup or amp that sounded as good to me as the unplugged bass fiddle did in my practice room at home. The more gear I bought, the more frustrated and disappointed I became. In 1990 Jim Cullum called to offer me an audition with his band in San Antonio with the stipulation that the bass position involved playing strictly unplugged. That immediately got my attention. Then, a phone conversation with bass legend Bob Haggart convinced me that this was the way to go.

Our friend Marty Grosz, acoustic guitarist, singer, raconteur and guest on Riverwalk Jazz, has a lot to say about how electrifying stringed instruments changes the way they function in a jazz setting. “With an amplifier, your sound is not coming out of you, it’s coming from behind you out of a box.” Furthermore, he says, the string height of electric instruments is usually so low that the player feels very little resistance under his fingers. Marty says, you’ve got to have that “fight” or a certain amount of stiffness, to create a pulse that swings.

During 14 happy unplugged, amp-less years with the Cullum band, I’ve come to learn that creating swinging rhythm involves some physical as well as mental effort. I realized why jazz performances captured on old 78-rpm disks often swing more and sound more alive than on more modern ones: The pre-electric player had to learn how to draw a living sound and swinging pulse out of a hollow wooden instrument by moving and controlling a resonating air column with sheer muscle power and musicality.

Now we’re getting somewhere!

Today my music room closet is full of pickups, cables, amps, pre-amps, equalizers, etc., gathering dust. I should probably get rid of all of it on eBay, but it’s nice to know it’s all there in case I have to “go electric” again. But by then it will all probably be way obsolete, and I’ll have to start over from scratch.

Naaah!

Postscript:

Here I am 6 years after I wrote this, living in Southwest Florida and free-lancing. Yup, my gear turned out to be way obsolete. After 19 unplugged years I awoke Rip Van Winkle-like to the world of amplified jazz. I’m using a Gage Realist pickup and an Acoustic Image amp. Sometimes plugging in is unavoidable, especially in those “special” situations where the crowd has been drinking and, their hearing slightly alcohol- impaired, they start barking at each other, even before the band starts playing. Other times it works better if I play unplugged so guests don’t have to shout to have a conversation. That way the rest of the guests who want to hear the music can do so. I’m lucky that I have a nice Mittenwald round-back bass from about 1920 that has a robust sound of its own, especially strung the way it is with high action and gut strings. I bought an electric bass but have not yet used it on a gig down here. And I’m working 7 nights a week. Not every gig situation (or drummer) is suitable for unplugged playing, but those that are are the ones I want.

Written by Don Mopsick

December 23, 2011 at 6:21 PM